UD Logo
School of Education
Textbook Cover

Computational Thinking on the Internet

Chapter 2: Surfing and Searching

After completing Chapter 2, you will know how to:

End of Chapter Labs

Lab Project 2.1: Sharing Bookmarks and Favorites

One of the most valuable resources a school or company can have is a list of good, reliable, recommended Web sites where employees can go to accomplish the kinds of tasks typical of the workplace. In this chapter, you learned how Web browsers contain a bookmark or favorites mechanism for accessing such sites quickly. Imagine that your employer has asked you to create a common list of bookmarked favorites that your fellow employees can use to enhance productivity in your workplace. If you have Chrome, follow these steps:

  1. Use the Chrome browser to visit the sites you want included in the list of bookmarked favorites.
  2. While you are at each site, follow the steps you learned in this chapter to bookmark it.
  3. Your list should contain at least seven bookmarks. If you need help finding seven appropriate sites, use the search engines you learned in this chapter.
  4. Use the More menu to choose Bookmarks→Bookmark Manager.
  5. Pull down the Organize menu and choose Export Bookmarks to HTML File.
  6. When Chrome asks where you want to save the exported file, use the controls to choose the folder of your choice. Your bookmarks.html file will be copied into the folder you designate. Click Save.

If you are using Firefox, follow these steps:

  1. Use the Firefox browser to visit the sites you want included in the list of bookmarked favorites.
  2. While you are at each site, follow the steps you learned in this chapter to bookmark it.
  3. Your list should contain at least seven bookmarks. If you need help finding seven appropriate sites, use the search engines you learned in this chapter.
  4. Pull down the Bookmarks menu and choose Show All Bookmarks.
  5. Pull down the Action menu and choose Export Bookmarks to HTML.
  6. When Firefox asks where you want to save the exported file, use the controls to choose the folder of your choice. Your bookmarks.html file will be copied into the folder you designate. Click Save.

If your instructor asked you to hand in the exported bookmark file, copy that file to a disk, or follow the other instructions your instructor gave you for submitting this assignment. If you have trouble finding the bookmark file, use the Macintosh Finder or the Windows Start menu's Search option to locate it. Later in this book, after you learn how to publish files on the Web, you will be able to publish this bookmark file to a location from which your users can easily access it over the Web or import it into their browser's bookmarks or favorites.

Lab Project 2.2: Making PDF Documents Accessible

In this lab, you will accomplish the following learning objectives:

You probably know that your word processor has a Save As PDF feature that can save your document as a PDF file. Do you also know that if you structure the document with heading styles before you save as PDF, the resulting PDF will contain a navigable table of contents? Originally intended to help users with special needs navigate, this table of contents feature is handy for all users who can thereby use the document’s table of contents to jump quickly where you want to go.
To create an accessible PDF, follow these steps:

  1. Use your word processor to open or create the document you plan to convert into a PDF. These instructions use MS Word.
  2. If the document does not have headings, create some headings in the document. You do this by inserting a blank line in front of a paragraph where you type the heading that applies to that part of the document. The text you are reading now, for example, is in the Lab Project 2.3 section heading.
  3. Give each heading a heading style. To do this, select the heading, then use your word processor's Styles menu to give it a heading style. Give main headings the "Heading 1" style. If your document has subheadings, make them have the "Heading 2" style. If there is a third level of structure, you can use the "Heading 3" style. Your word processor has many more levels but in general it is not good to overdo it making too many levels of subheadings.
  4. Save the document you created in the previous three steps.
  5. Pull down the Save menu and choose the option to Save as PDF.
  6. When the Save dialog appears, click the Options button to pop out the Acrobat PDFMaker settings.
  7. Select the PDFMaker options to convert document information, enable accessibility, create bookmarks, and convert word headings to bookmarks.
  8. Click OK to close the PDFMaker settings, then click Save to create the PDF file.

To experience the power of what you have done, open the PDF file. In the sidebar, choose the bookmark icon to show the bookmarks menu. Click around the various items to see how they work. Notice how you can click the minus and plus signs to contract or expand the menu. This is awesome to know how to do, and now you are so empowered!

If your instructor asked you to hand in this lab, there are two items you need to submit. First, you will submit the PDF document, which have a .pdf filename extension. Second, you submit a word processor file in which you write a brief essay explaining what you think about the capability this lab has given you. Although the purpose of the lab was making the document accessible to users with special needs, notice how it works better for all users. In your essay, write what you think about this realization that making a document accessible improves access for all. Can you think of other kinds of accessibility where this is also true? What personal experience do you have using things intended for people with special needs?